Confusing Words of the Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • precedence – priority
    • He gave precedence to Sally, who had been waiting the longest.
  • precedents – established rules
    • He went by the precedents for Phase 10 even though his family used different rules
  • precedent – an established rule
    • The court went with the precedent set by statute.
  • president – the head of an organization
    • The president was elected at the meeting last night.

Memory tips:

  • Precedent/precedents – remember the “t” as following rules to the “t”

Confusing Words Of The Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • adverse – harmful; hostile; unfavorable
    • They expected an adverse reaction to the change in the PTO policy.
  • averse – opposed (to)
    • He was averse to having kale on the menu.

Memory tips:

  • adverse – since the difference is the letter “d” being included in this word, I would think of “dang,” “dynamite,” or another “d” word that makes you think of being on the verge of being harmful.
  • averse – think of “vice versa” or opposites so it is opposed to

Attorneys and Apostrophes

Attorneys and ApostrophesI found this article and thought it was interesting. Incorrect use of apostrophes is probably my biggest pet peeve. It isn’t really hard. If you need to show possession or show that letters are missing, use an apostrophe. Otherwise, for the most part, do not use an apostrophe. There are, of course, exceptions, but you need to learn the difference because I’m pretty sure that you don’t want your attorney’s work to be the topic of a FindLaw article.

Attorney Objects to Motion’s Use of Apostrophes, Possessives

Though she managed to graduate from law school, Anissa Bluebaum apparently never managed to master elementary school grammar.

Or at least that’s what her fellow attorney had to say when he responded to a complaint in a civil lawsuit filed by Bluebaum.

Her egregious use of apostrophes made it impossible to tell who she was referring to and when.

Anissa Bluebaum is representing Alison Peck (a teacher who was busted for sleeping with her students) in a lawsuit against her former probation officer, Rebecca Martin, reports the Springfield News-Leader.

When Martin’s attorney, Richard Crites, received the complaint, he was a bit baffled. But Crites soldiered on, responding on behalf of his client.

With 8 pages of questions.

Apparently, the lawsuit was filed against Martin and her brother, but because Bluebaum had rendered the complaint incoherent by misusing both “defendants” and “defendant’s,” Crites was unable to tell whether statements were referring to one or both parties.

He also requested that Bluebaum respond to his request in paragraph form.

Did Bluebaum write her pleading like a stream-of-consciousness text message, too?

As you may know, glaring grammatical errors can be disastrous to your case (and make you look a bit ridiculous). So the next time you’re confronted with multiple parties to which you need to attribute actions or statements, keep the following in mind:

  • Defendants is more than one defendant;
  • Defendant’s is the possessive of a singular defendant; and
  • Defendants’ is the possessive of more than one defendant.

If you’re still unsure, ask around–you don’t want to end up like Anissa Bluebaum.

http://blogs.findlaw.com/greedy_associates/2011/06/attorney-objects-to-motions-use-of-apostrophes-possessives.html

 

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

http://proofthatblog.com/2018/03/02/grammar-giggle-i-want-what-shes-having/

http://proofthatblog.com/2018/03/05/grammar-giggle-ablquerque/

http://proofthatblog.com/2018/03/06/confusing-words-of-the-week-18/

http://60isthenew60blog.com/2018/03/07/surgery-cancer-love-and-life/

http://proofthatblog.com/2018/03/08/happy-national-proofreading-day/

 

Happy National Proofreading Day!

Happy National Proofreading Day!March 8 is National Proofreading Day. It is a day that was created to bring awareness to how important it is to proofread. National Proofreading Day promotes error free writing–and so do I! This message of National Proofreading Day is the message of Proof That proofreading blog and is set out in a blog post entitled “Why Proofreading Is Important.” Please take a minute and just proofread your last email, a text, or the letter you’re working on. It really is important!

Confusing Words of the Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • Conscience – the sense of right and wrong

His conscience wouldn’t let him steal the candy bar.

  • Conscious – cognizant; sensible; aware

She was conscious of the man staring at her.

Memory tips:

  • Conscience – The science of the brain knowing the difference between right and wrong
  • Conscious – Contains the letters I C U so you are aware. Conscience does not contain the “U.”

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

Grammar Giggle – Tog Hether

Grammar Giggle – Everyday

Confusing Words Of The Week

Grammar In The News – It’s So Gangsta!

 

Grammar In The News – It’s So Gangsta!

Grammar In TheI love it when grammar issues become a news story. Grammar is important! And apparently so is knowing your slang when you’re on a national game show.

http://nationalpost.com/entertainment/television/jeopardy-contestant-loses-thousands-by-going-gangsta-on-grammar

 

Confusing Words Of The Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • Casual – incidental; informal
    • The party attire was casual, so I wore jeans.
  • Causal – causing
    • The casual link to the accident was her cell phone.

Memory tips:

Casual – “You all” (casUAL) are more comfortable in an informal atmosphere

Causal – Root is “cause” so “causal” is “causing”

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

Grammar Giggle – Movelist

Grammar Giggle – In The Past, I Passed The Top Score

Confusing Words of the Week

I’m Number 2!