Confusing Words of the Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • cash – ready money
    • It is rare to find someone with cash in their wallet these days.
  • cache – a hiding place
    • The news reported a cache of weapons found in a house on my street.
  • cachet – a mark of approval
    • The firm had the cachet of various organizations.

Memory tips:

  • cash – everyone knows this one
  • cache – pronounced ˈkash – placE to hidE cash
  • cachet – pronounced  ka-ˈshā – you will sashay for the cachet

Grammar Giggle – Every Day

On a recent trip to Albuquerque, we visited the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History. While I was there because my husband was very interested in it, I used it more as an opportunity to check for potential Grammar Giggles. I was successful. As I’ve written about previously, everyday means commonplace or ordinary as in an everyday occurrence and every day means something that happens every single day or each day. In this case, they really mean ordinary or commonplace life. The comma with “Site ‘Y’,” is an extra. Besides the fact that if it needed a comma there, it would be inside the ending quotation marks,it really doesn’t need a comma there at all. They are talking about “Site ‘Y’ as it was called during the war,” but there does not need to be a comma after “Y.”

Los Alamos

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

Grammar Giggle – Circumvent

Grammar Giggle – I Love . . . What??

Confusing Words Of The Week

 

Confusing Words Of The Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • imitate – to resemble; to mimic
    • The baby loves to imitate Beyonce’s “Put a Ring on It” video.
  • intimate – (adj.) innermost; familiar (pronounced “in te met”); (v) to hint; to make known (pronounced “in ti mate”)
    • She had intimate knowledge of the company’s employment manual.
    • He had to intimate that he wanted a new car for his birthday.

Memory tips:

  • iMItate – MImic
  • intiMATE – you get intimate with your mate and you hint to your mate

Grammar Giggle – I Love . . . What??

A friend sent this one to me. It’s crazy to me that some people don’t check merchandise for errors before it is manufactured and then expect to make tons of money from it.

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

Grammar Giggle – Stucture

Grammar Giggle – Firom

Confusing Words of the Week

F*@k Everyone

 

Confusing Words of the Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • currant – a berry
    • I haven’t yet tried currant jam.
  • current – (adj.) belonging to the present; (n.) a flow of water or electricity
    • Joe needed to do a report on current events.
    • Jane was shocked by the electrical current.

Memory tips:

  • currAnt – jAm made of currant berries
  • currEnt – prEsent; Electricity

Grammar Giggle – Firom

This was in our local newspaper. I didn’t see it at first because my brain expected to read “from,” but that’s not what it says and is a perfect example of why proofreading–and actually reading–your work.

Firom