Confusing Words of the Week

It’s time for “Confusing WoWords of the Weekrds of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

Respectably – in a manner worthy of respect

The young boy received an award for acting respectably.

Respectfully – in a courteous manner

While being introduced to the baseball player, the girl acted respectfully and received an autographed baseball in return.

Respectively – in the order indicated

Jane and Joe finished the race at 5:34 and 6:46, respectively.

MEMORY TIPS:

RespectAbly – mAnner worth of respect

RespectFULLy – FULL of respect.

RespectIvely – in the Indicated order

Grammar Giggle – Sneak Peak Part Three

Although we’ve had this same issue TWICE with a television station before, I’m sharing a new Grammar Giggle. This one came from my son, who made me so proud that he knew the difference between “peak” and “peek.” One more time, peak is the top (as in a mountain), peek is to glance quickly or furtively, and pique is resentment or to offend. I’m not aware of any sneak top or sneak resentment, but they are talking about getting a sneaky quick glance at an upcoming show–like a sneak peek!

Sneak Peak

Confusing Words of the Week

It’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

rain – falling water.

The rain was pouring down.

rein – (n.) part of a bridle; (v.) to check; to stop.

It was time to rein in the committee members who had launched off onto a different topic.

reign – (n.) the term of a ruler’s power; a period during which power is exercised; (v.) to rule.

The reign of the chapter president is over.

Some hints to help remember are that to stop something–like a horse–is to rein them in (like the horse’s rein) while reign looks pretty royal to me with the silent “g.”

Grammar Giggle – Jalopeno

I saw this pop up on the register as I was checking out of the grocery store recently. We’re in Arizona where jalapenos are practically in every meal (at least at my house). It would be nice to spell it correctly. #proofthatblog #grammargiggles #frysmarketplace

Jalopeno

Grammar Giggle – Too Bad She’s Not More Famous

My local news station is keeping me in more material. If Jamie Lee Curtis was some kind of bit actress or had a really difficult name, it just might be understandable that they misspelled her name–but she’s not and it’s not. There is just no excuse.

Confusing Words of the Week

It’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

Interstate – Between states

Intrastate – Within one state

Intestate – Dying without a will

TIPS:

Interstate is between states, so you are entering (inter) different states as you travel through, while intrAstate is in the same state so you’re not entering other states, you are staying “In” the sAme state. Intestate means that it is going INto probate because there is no will.

Grammar Giggle – Sorry, You Will Not Get My Corperation

This was in my spam. None of it makes any sense to me, but the heading made me laugh. I know there are others in the body of the email, but I don’t have enough time or patience to try to figure it out, so we’ll go with the heading.

Grammar Giggle – Really Old

A friend sent this to me and I mean no disrespect to Chester Bennington, but this is a pretty glaring error. He was born in 1976. This is an instance where transposition is inexcusable. Didn’t someone actually look at it before it was sent out?