Grammar Giggle – Licence

While licence is not exactly INcorrect in that it is correct in, for example, Britain, Canada, and South Africa, this truck was in Mesa, Arizona, part of the United States, where license is correct.

Licence2

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

http://proofthatblog.com/2018/04/20/grammar-giggle-demons/

http://proofthatblog.com/2018/04/23/grammar-giggle-mental-heal-professional/

http://proofthatblog.com/2018/04/24/confusing-words-of-the-week-25/

http://proofthatblog.com/2018/04/25/how-do-you-define-proofread/

How Do You Define Proofread?

proofthatblog.com (2)n a fun twist on defining “proofread,” I decided to use each letter to come up with what proofreading means to me.

Providing the best product possible is the goal of proofreading.

Reading, and reading again, to make sure your document says what you think it says and says it correctly.

Outline defined terms in a second screen so you capitalize those throughout your document as defined and so you only define it once.

Organize what you need. If you’re reviewing a hard copy, have a red pen, good lighting, and a closed door if possible. If you’re reviewing online, you need good lighting, redlining on (easiest with no markup showing so you can see how it really looks), and a closed door if possible.

Formatting the document so that it looks good, margins are the same throughout, spacing is good, font is the same, no widow or orphan lines straggling on any page, and if necessary, it meets the court rules for formatting.

Redline your suggested edits so the author can see what you are suggesting be changed so you are not changing the entire meaning of the language.

Everything should be reviewed. Proofread your emails, letters, documents, and anything else that you are involved in and that reflects you.

Allow time to read the entire document through and to make any edits that are necessary.

Delete commas. Most people use far too many commas, but you have to understand the use of commas before you just start deleting them.

 

Confusing Words Of The Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • flesh out – to give substance to; to make something fuller
    • She fleshed out the presentation with quizzes over the material.
  • flush out – to cleanse; to force something to the surface
    • He flushed out the radiator and added fresh fluid.

Memory tips:

  • flesh out – think of filling out flesh thus making it fuller
  • flush out – flushing the toilet cleanses it

Grammar Giggle – Mental Heal Professional

A friend sent this line from something she received at work. Spell check would not find this one so sometimes you just need to read things before you send them out.

Mental heal professional

Grammar Giggle – Demons

This is a great example of why font matters. The word is correct except the font used makes it look wrong. Appearance in any document makes a difference, so print it out and look at it to make sure there isn’t a weird font or inconsistent spacing. As for the demons/lemons, I would be kind of afraid to buy them.

Demons

www.proofthatblog.com

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

Grammar Giggle – Preapre

Grammar Giggle – Cricles

Confusing Words of the Week

Knocking The Shout Out Of You

Confusing Words of the Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • precedence – priority
    • He gave precedence to Sally, who had been waiting the longest.
  • precedents – established rules
    • He went by the precedents for Phase 10 even though his family used different rules
  • precedent – an established rule
    • The court went with the precedent set by statute.
  • president – the head of an organization
    • The president was elected at the meeting last night.

Memory tips:

  • Precedent/precedents – remember the “t” as following rules to the “t”

Grammar Giggle – Cricles

Not one, but TWO, errors in the same headline on my news station. I’m sure this is all intentional to keep me in material. They misspelled not only “circle,” but “from.” Neither of those is difficult, but “form”is an example of a misspelled word by context, but a real word that spell check would not catch–but a human looking at their work should.

 

www.proofthatblog.com

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