Grammar Giggle – Military Unintelligence

My cousin sent this one to me. Seems to me that if “intelligence” is part of the name of your event, you would figure out how to spell it correctly. This is particularly important if you are spending the money for such a big banner.

Military intelligence

Grammar Giggle – Congratulate Your Gaad

A friend sent this to me from her cousin’s graduation party. Apparently, they have had this sign since their first child graduated.  It is their family funny and now it is a Grammar Giggle.

IMG_3250-2

Grammar Giggle – The Correct Name of The City on the Diploma Would Be Nice!

This was on my local news station. Apparently, another Arizona city high school had a slight problem with their diplomas–they all spelled the name of the city wrong. It should be “Tucson” but is spelled “Tuscon.” I apologize for the quality of the picture so you can’t really see it well. The banners on news programs sometimes drive me crazy because they always seem to cover something up.

Diploma

 

Grammar Giggle – Spainish 

I have not shared Grammar Giggles from my European vacation because English is not their primary language so I was generous with any small errors I saw. However, on the Big Bus tour, I found this error. Since they are a large company with offices worldwide (including the US), I’m not so ready to cut them as much slack. So when I saw this one, the phone camera came out. 

Grammar Giggle – It Couldn’t Have Been More Clear

This I found on Twitter. The correct phrase should be “couldn’t have gotten.” I think the error happens because when you are actually saying the phrase out loud, it sounds like “couldn’t uv gotten” so people assume it is “of” instead of “have.” That is incorrect.

Grammar “Used To Be” More Important

This is a pretty common error that I saw on a TV ad recently. The phrase “use to be” is incorrect. When you’re talking about something that happened in the past but doesn’t happen anymore, the correct phrase is “used to be.” In this sentence it means that in the past, surgery was the only option, but it is not the only option anymore, so “used to be” would be correct.