Grammar Giggle – Demons

This is a great example of why font matters. The word is correct except the font used makes it look wrong. Appearance in any document makes a difference, so print it out and look at it to make sure there isn’t a weird font or inconsistent spacing. As for the demons/lemons, I would be kind of afraid to buy them.

Demons

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Confusing Words of the Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • precedence – priority
    • He gave precedence to Sally, who had been waiting the longest.
  • precedents – established rules
    • He went by the precedents for Phase 10 even though his family used different rules
  • precedent – an established rule
    • The court went with the precedent set by statute.
  • president – the head of an organization
    • The president was elected at the meeting last night.

Memory tips:

  • Precedent/precedents – remember the “t” as following rules to the “t”

Grammar Giggle – Cricles

Not one, but TWO, errors in the same headline on my news station. I’m sure this is all intentional to keep me in material. They misspelled not only “circle,” but “from.” Neither of those is difficult, but “form”is an example of a misspelled word by context, but a real word that spell check would not catch–but a human looking at their work should.

 

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Proof That proofreading blog Grammar Giggle

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

Grammar Giggle – Wildifre

Grammar Giggle – Administor

Confusing Words Of The Week

Wi-Fi, Wifi, Wi-fi, WiFi–Which One Is Right?

Wi-Fi, Wifi, Wi-fi, WiFi–Which One Is Right?

Wi-Fi

Wi-Fi, Wifi, Wi-fi, WiFi–Which One Is Right? proofthatblog.com

I was recently a passenger on a road trip from Albuquerque to Phoenix. On that route, there are tons of billboards, some very professional and some not so much. One thing I noticed as I was checking for errors was the many ways that hotels spell the word indicating you will be able to use your phone, tablet, e-reader, watch, etc. to access the internet (usually for free).

I decided to do a little bit of research to find out what the appropriate spelling should be. That sounds easy, doesn’t it? Well, it isn’t.

  • According to Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary, “Wi-fi” is used to certify the interoperability of wireless computer networking devices. (Spelling #1)
  • The AP Stylebook’s dictionary of choice–Webster’s New World–defines “Wi-Fi” as an abbreviation for wireless fidelity, meaning you can access or connect to a network using radio waves, without needing to use wires. (Spelling #2) Webster’s also indicates that it is also written “WiFi.” (Spelling #3)
  • Tripsavvy.com (a true expert on spelling and definitions) defines “wifi” as “the wireless network you connect to that allows you to access the internet.” (Spelling #4)
  • The American Heritage Dictionary indicates that “Wi-Fi” is a trademark for the certification of products that meet certain standards for transmitting data over wireless networks.
  • The Chicago Manual of Style indicates that “Wi-Fi” is a trademark.
  • “Wi-Fi” is the registered trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance, who “brings us Wi-Fi.” Their website indicates they coined the term “Wi-Fi” and they certify Wi-Fi products.

I found several more instances of the “Wi-Fi” spelling. In addition, it seems that Wi-Fi Alliance is more the expert and that’s the way that organization spells it–so “Wi-Fi” seems the most correct.

Confusing Words Of The Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • adverse – harmful; hostile; unfavorable
    • They expected an adverse reaction to the change in the PTO policy.
  • averse – opposed (to)
    • He was averse to having kale on the menu.

Memory tips:

  • adverse – since the difference is the letter “d” being included in this word, I would think of “dang,” “dynamite,” or another “d” word that makes you think of being on the verge of being harmful.
  • averse – think of “vice versa” or opposites so it is opposed to

Grammar Giggle – Wildifre

My local news station comes through for me again with this misspelling that would have been caught both by actually looking at it AND by using spellcheck. #proofread #proofthatblog #azfamily

Wildifre

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

Grammar Giggle – Weeknd

Grammar Giggle – Friend Chicken

Confusing Words Of The Week