Grammar Giggle – Menus

I went to lunch recently and saw this menu. While the proper version is “house-made,” which means something is prepared in the establishment in which it is sold, while “homemade” is something made in a home. In other words, it appears three different ways–including the correct way–all on one page. And the original error I found was “quinoa” misspelled one line below where it is spelled correctly.

Housemade

Grammar Giggle – The Lobster Mushroom’s What?

I caught this one on a recent trip to Norfolk for our conference. Yet another misuse of an apostrophe. Apostrophes do not always make a word plural!

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past couple of weeks.

Grammar Giggle – Worn

Grammar Giggle – Close Profanity

Confusing Words of the Week

Step Away From The Buffet Line!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Grammar Giggle – Forty’s and 70s

Grammar Giggle – Phoenix or Pheonix?

Confusing Words of the Week

Confusing Words of the Week

Words of the Weekt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

“Compliment” – an expression of praise, commendation, or admiration

  • “She paid me an enormous compliment on my dress.”

“Complement” is something that completes or makes perfect

  • A good wine is a complement to a good meal.”

Memory Tips:

A complIment is something I like to hear.

COMPLEment COMPLEtes something.

Grammar Giggle – Phoenix or Pheonix?

This was in an email I received. Because I live near Phoenix and work there, I noticed this right away. I also noticed that it is right in four other places and wrong in the very first line.

Phoenix guide2

Grammar Giggle – Forty’s and 70s

My brother sent me this one. I loved this drive in theater and spent many a date night there . . . but enough about that. There were so many errors in these two sentences. Here are my edits to it:

  • “Opened” should not be capitalized. There is a comma right ahead of it, so I’m assuming it is a continuation of the same sentence and part of a series.
  • Naming a decade is done as “the 1940s,” “the forties,” or the “the ’40s.”
  • “It’s” means “it is.”
  • “Til” I’m assuming is some kind of abbreviation for “until,” although it isn’t correct unless it begins with an apostrophe indicating that “un” is missing–’til.

Pioneer drive in

Happy Thanksgiving!

Today I’m spending time with my family, but I wanted to take a minute to let you all know that again this year, I am extremely grateful for you–the Proof That reader. Thank you for continuing to read the blog and especially thank you to those of you who send me Grammar Giggles, tell me that you learned something, or take the time to seek me out if you see me in person to let me know that you read the blog. Happy Thanksgiving!
Thanksgiving commas

Confusing Words of the Week

It’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

Rifle – to ransack and steal

  • They rifled through the dresser drawers looking for valuables.

Riffle – to flip through

  • I don’t like to riffle a magazine, I read it page by page.

Memory Tips:

I would probably think of “riffle” with multiple “f” as the sound a magazine or book makes when your flip the pages–the same sound over and over (we’ll use the “f” sound).

Rifle I would associate with criminals using guns, so criminals are the ones who would be ransacking and stealing.

 

Grammar Giggle – Close Profanity

My daughter sent this one to me. My neighbors may think they live in “close profanity” to me, but I’m pretty sure they meant to say “close proximity.”

Close Profanity