Grammar Giggle – Eat Outdoors Every Day–Just Not At This Restaurant

I saw this recently at a restaurant. “Outdoor” is defined as “done, situated, or used out of doors.” It should be one word. “Everyday” is an adjective (a word that modifies a noun) defined as “happening or used every day” as in “Her everyday chore is doing the dishes.” “Every day” is an adverb (a word that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word group, expressing a relation of place, time, circumstance, manner, cause, degree–in this case relation of time to offering outdoor dining and take out). In this instance, “everyday” should be two words. See a tip for figuring out when to use “every day” here.

Grammar Giggle – Chandler

My daughter sent this to me from her local Facebook Marketplace and it took me a minute to figure it out. I had trouble because we have a city here named “Chandler,” so that word didn’t trigger anything until I looked at what they were selling. It should be “chandelier,” so there are a few letters missing. And then I saw the name of the city. There was no winning with this ad.

Grammar Giggle – Corn Teen

A friend sent this to me and while I assume it was taken from another someplace on the internet, I’m using it anyway. If you read ANYTHING about the pandemic, you should know how to spell “quarantine.” And if you don’t know, you probably have access to a dictionary on your phone, so use that.

Grammar Giggle – Opeartor

Over the weekend I was watching the very end of Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights while I was waiting for West Side Story to start. I don’t typically watch movie credits but happened to catch this as it was scrolling by:

And since I’m not involved in the movie industry, I even Googled that position to make sure it wasn’t a real thing. It isn’t.

I may have to start paying more attention to movie credits. They do have some very unusual titles there and apparently, they don’t think anyone reads them.

Grammar Giggle – Stomrs

A Proof That reader sent this to me. They got it right in one place, wrong in two places, and we should take bets on how the one behind her is spelled. It really doesn’t take long to take a second look at something and will make you look better in the long run. Slow down and check spelling.

Grammar Giggle – Restaurant Costumers

This was in a local news story. It is even more concerning to me because they got it right in one place, but wrong the first time it is used. Just for clarification:

  • Costumer – a person or company that makes or supplies theatrical or fancy-dress costumes
  • Customer – a person or organization that buys goods or services from a store or business