Grammar Giggle – More Healthier

A friend was recently shopping online for a bread machine when she came upon this description. There are so many issues with this information.

  • “More healthier” is not correct. It should just be “Healthier.” Healthier already says it is more healthy than not healthy.
  • “More evenly heated” does not need the “More” capitalized. There is a comma–not a period–after the incorrect “healthier,” so the next word (unless it is a proper noun) should not be capitalized.
  • “the bread tastes better and more fragrant” makes me wonder how you can taste “fragrant.” To be completely correct, this line should have said: “the bread tastes better, and is more fragrant.” Note what would be the Oxford comma as well after “better.”

The one thing going for them is that everything is at least spelled correctly.

Grammar Giggle – Opeartor

Over the weekend I was watching the very end of Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights while I was waiting for West Side Story to start. I don’t typically watch movie credits but happened to catch this as it was scrolling by:

And since I’m not involved in the movie industry, I even Googled that position to make sure it wasn’t a real thing. It isn’t.

I may have to start paying more attention to movie credits. They do have some very unusual titles there and apparently, they don’t think anyone reads them.

Grammar Giggle – Rod Iron

I’ve seen this error before and I think have even posted a previous Grammar Giggle with this same issue, but this was in my local Facebook Marketplace recently. It should be WROUGHT iron–which is one of two types of iron, the other being cast iron.

Grammar Giggle – Stomrs

A Proof That reader sent this to me. They got it right in one place, wrong in two places, and we should take bets on how the one behind her is spelled. It really doesn’t take long to take a second look at something and will make you look better in the long run. Slow down and check spelling.

Grammar Giggle – Restaurant Costumers

This was in a local news story. It is even more concerning to me because they got it right in one place, but wrong the first time it is used. Just for clarification:

  • Costumer – a person or company that makes or supplies theatrical or fancy-dress costumes
  • Customer – a person or organization that buys goods or services from a store or business

Grammar Giggle – Athelete Of The Year

A lot of high schools are turning to social media to showcase their 2020 graduating class since they are foregoing the traditional graduation ceremony. I am super proud of my grandson and super disappointed that he doesn’t get the pomp and circumstance of graduation but was happy that his school put together a slideshow of all the seniors. They had special recognition for the Valedictorian, Salutatorian, and the male and female Athletes of the Year, EXCEPT while they spelled the hard ones right, they misspelled Athletes of the Year as “Atheletes of the Year.” I know that is how some people pronounce it, but it is not correct. Oh, and my smart and handsome grandson is the male ATHLETE of the Year!

Grammar Giggle – Advise On Giving Advice

A friend shared this with me from a webinar she attended. This word is confused a lot. Here are the definitions:

  • Advice – information; recommendation. The advice of the lawyer was to pay the fine.
  • Advise – to recommend; to give counsel. The lawyer advised her to gather all her documentation.

Confusing Words

It’s time for “Confusing Words of the Month” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This month’s words are:

  • flaunt – to display showily
    • He was trying to flaunt his new sportscar to his friends.
  • flout – to treat with contempt
    • Because she didn’t like the school principal, she decided to flout his rules.

Memory tips:

  • flaunt – Think of laun as launch because they want to launch their possessions out as far and as high as possible so everyone can see them flaunt it.
  • flout – Use the out piece of the word to remember they are treating the thing like they want it out of their life.

Grammar Giggle – Watch Out For That Fentanly!

A recent online news story caught my eye. Although “fentanyl” is spelled correctly in the first paragraph, the spelling in the quote from our Pinal County Sheriff is misspelled. I highly doubt Sheriff Lamb mispronounced it, so I’m thinking the news outlet misspelled it.