Grammar Giggle – Happy Independence Day!

I received this email this week from a local restaurant. Email subjects are just as important as the email itself. It’s obvious they know HOW to spell “independence,” but it’s also obvious they didn’t check it before hitting send.

Confusing Words Of The Week

It’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words are:

  • Healthful – promoting health (e.g., a healthful food)
  • Healthy – being in good health (e.g., a healthy person)

Memory tips:

  • Healthful – Things that promote good health are full of health
  • Healthy – Things alreadin good health are healthy

Replay Thursday

Thursday ReplayIt’s time for a review of recent blog posts just in case you’ve missed them. We call this Replay Thursday. Here are posts from Proof That proofreading blog and 60 Is The New 60 blog during the past week.

Grammar Giggle – Weeknd

Grammar Giggle – Friend Chicken

Confusing Words Of The Week

 

Grammar Giggle – Everyday

This was another sign I recently saw for sale. Here is a link to a blog post I wrote on this very topic. This sign should be “Every Day.”

proofthatblog.com

 

Grammar Giggle – Tog Hether

I saw this sign in a Home Goods store recently. It took me a minute looking at it before I was completely confused. I have never heard of a “tog hether,” but I can’t think of why else they would have added the extra “h.” I’d like to know about tog hether because I love to travel and it sounds like a fun place!

Tog Hether

Confusing Words of the Week

Words of the WeekIt’s time for “Confusing Words of the Week” where I take a set of two or three words that get confused and give you definitions and try to give you a memory trick to help you remember when to use which word. If you have words that confuse you, use the Ask PTB tab on the website or send an email to proofthatblog@gmail.com and they may appear here soon!

This week’s words were part of yesterday’s Grammar Giggle. They are:

Passed – moved along; transferred (past tense of past)

He passed along his notes from the seminar to Jean.

Past – time gone by

In the past, our televisions had five channels.

Memory tips:

Passed – Think of the “ss” as tracks where you are moving something along

Past – Think of “ast” as like “aft”er as in something that has already happened.

 

 

Lay or Lie?

The words lie or lay seem to cause problems for people. How do you know when to use which one? Let’s see if we can clear it up a little bit.

Lie or Lay

Lay (lay, laid, laying) means “to put” or “to place.” Because it’s a verb (action word) it requires an object to complete the meaning:

  • Please lay the groceries on the counter.
  • She laid her resignation letter on the boss’s desk.
  • He is always laying his schoolbooks on the kitchen table.

Lie (lie, lay, lain, lying) means “to recline, rest, or stay” or “to take a position of rest.” Unlike lay, which requires it, lie cannot take an object.

  • She said she was going to lie on the bed to test the mattress.
  • The pleading was lying on his desk for him to sign.

A way to remember the difference is that if you can replace the questionable lie or lay with place (or the correct version of it), then you need to use the correct version of lay. If it doesn’t, use the correct version of lie.

  • She wanted to (lay or lie) down for a nap. Would you say “She wanted to place down for a nap.”? No! So the proper word would be lie.
  • He (laid or lay) the coffee on his secretary’s desk. Is it “He placed the coffee on his secretary’s desk.”? Yes! Then laid is correct.

Another reminder hint might be if you are going to plAce something, then you are going to lAy it, but if you are going to rEst, you are going to liE.