Grammar Giggle – Monday Or Thursday?

This was a Facebook post from our local news station. I was trying to figure out exactly when the space station would be visible in my area when I noticed that one place said Monday and one place said Thursday in the same story. The correct answer is that it was Thursday, but it was also confusing.

Grammar Giggle – Unites States of America

I am not sharing this example to start any kind of political discussion and any political comment will be deleted. The purpose is to show another example of spell check doing its job and checking how words are SPELLED–just not PROOFREADING and checking for content. The headings, inside addresses, “Re:” lines, and, as in this case, “To:” lines (among others) of letters and documents aren’t often looked at once they have been typed, so they are the perfect place for typos to get through.

Another thing that doesn’t help with those types of errors is Word settings. So go to your Word, File, Options, Proofing, and UNCHECK “Ignore words in UPPERCASE.” That way, spell check will at least check headings and other pieces of your work that are in all caps for spelling errors.

Grammar Giggle – We Recieve Another Incorrect Receive

Twice in one week I’ve now seen this same error. This time it is in my Microsoft Outlook email. While the fact that my inbox is full will surprise no one who knows me, I’m not sure why it is so difficult for a company like Microsoft to spell “receive” correctly.

Grammar Giggle – “Recieve” High Praise When You Spell Receive Correctly

I found this typo on one of our state government pages. Although “receive” is spelled correctly in two places in the same paragraph, the first one is obviously wrong. It does take some time to read through what you’ve written but avoiding these kinds of errors is worth it.

Grammar Giggle – Employee Appreciate Day

This was in my email recently. It was correct in one place, but incorrect in the subject line of the email—which is where your reader looks first. It’s the same in a business letter, the subject line is more important than many believe. Always read that as you’re proofing your letter or email.

Grammar Giggles – Plenty of Perjury

I saw this one making the rounds on Twitter. I’m pretty sure he meant “penalty,” but someone typed “plenty” and spell check didn’t catch it, so it made it through. Obviously, it is important to proofread every part of a document or letter–the caption, the introduction, the “re:” line, the signature line, any language after that, and the service list. If someone had actually read that paragraph, they should have caught that.

Grammar Giggles – How Many Days Does January Have?

I received this in response to an email I sent out. I realize that 2020 messed with our heads, but there are still only 31 days in January in 2021. It is important to review your out of office email after you type it to make sure it reads the way you want it to.

Grammar Giggles – It’s or Its?

This was on my television as I was checking out the available entertainment this weekend. “It’s” is not the possessive form of “it,” it is a contraction for “it is.” It is confusing because to make other words possessive, you add apostrophe “s,” but with the word “it,” the apostrophe “s” is only added to make it a contraction. Otherwise, “its” is the possessive form of “it.”